How to Tie a Scarf

July 11, 2020 I prefer to always wear my scarves in a “European Loop” which is a popular way to wear a scarf! Many celebrities are sporting the European Loop. But there are so many other great options!
Today, I wish to explore scarves in a little more detail, including:

  • A quick history of the scarf
  • Who looks good in a scarf?
  • Some great ways to tie, tuck, and drape your scarves

Where Do Scarves Come From?

The origins of the scarf go back as far as Ancient Egypt, where it is said that Queen Nefertiti wore an elegant headscarf as part of her glamorous wardrobe.Although Nefertiti has become an icon of feminine power and beauty, it is not just women who have historically worn scarves. Scarves, neckties, and bandanas have also been used by male soldiers to differentiate rank. Pilots relied on them to stay warm in the days where open cockpits were standard. It was not until the 19th century that scarves became a fashion statement. In the UK, Queen Victoria had beautiful silk scarves made to accompany her royal wardrobe. Soon after, they became a fashionable status symbol across Europe and America. 

Who Looks Good in a Scarf?

While we tend to think of scarves as being a staple item for a woman’s wardrobe, their military history means they’re a great accessory for a man’s outfit too. Whether the man in your life is more likely to wear a blazer, a smart pea coat, or a well-worn leather jacket, there’s a scarf to match. It’s not uncommon to see male celebrities wearing a scarfs.

Of course, scarves have been popular in mainstream women’s fashion for decades too. From Audrey Hepburn to Jenifer Aniston, some of the world’s most famous faces are often pictured wearing scarves. In summer or winter, smart or casual; there’s a scarf to suit virtually any look. 

Scarf Tying Methods

One of the main reasons why people avoid wearing scarves is simply because they don’t know the best way to tie one. There are plenty of simple ways to tie a scarf, and they all look fantastic! The following are some easy ways to tie scarfs:

The European Loop

The European loop is also referred to as the Casual Sleek knot or Parisian knot, and it is the simplest way to tie a scarf.  A European loop can work in any climate; a light silk scarf can keep the sun off the back of your neck and chest. A heavier knitted scarf will keep you comfortable when the temperature drops. A long rectangular scarf is ideal for making this loop, but if you’ are using a large square scarf, you’ll need to fold it diagonally first.

  • Step 1 Hold both ends of your scarf with one hand, creating a hoop where the scarf folds.
  • Step 2 Place the scarf around your neck, with the hoop side over one shoulder and the ends over the opposite shoulder.
  • Step 3 Keeping the hoop open with one hand, use your other hand to feed the ends of the scarf through the hoop.
  • Step 4 Pull the ends through the hoop, creating an even knot that sits on your chest or under your chin. In cold weather, you might want to tighten the scarf to keep you warm.

That’s it! It Is probably the easiest way to tie a scarf. It creates a timeless, and elegant look! You can leave the loose ends outside your outer layer, or tuck them in for a little extra warmth.

The Jillee European Loop

According to onegoodthing, they created a variation of the European loop that I looks stylish. Give it a try and see if you agree!

  • Step 1 Again, hold both ends of your scarf together to create a hoop at the other end.
  • Step 2 Drape the scarf around your neck, letting the hoop end of the scarf drop over your chest.
  • Step 3 Keep the hoop open with one hand, then pass ONE of the loose ends OVER one side of the hoop and UNDER the other side.  Now take the other loose end and do the same thing, but in REVERSE. Weave the end UNDER one side of the hoop and then OVER the other side.
  • When you cinch the scarf up, you’ll get a beautiful knot that looks sophisticated enough to wear for business or with formal party wear.

5 Ways to Wear a Scarf Without Knots

Scarf knots are not for everyone;. lLike turtlenecks, they can sometimes feel a little claustrophobic tucked against your neck. Do not worry if you prefer to keep a scarf a little looser. There are some equally stylish ways to add a scarf without tying it!

The Simple Drape

This is the easiest way to wear a scarf by far. It involves letting the scarf fall around your neck and down your front. It’ is probably not going to add any warmth to your outfit, but it’s a fantastic way of adding an eye-catching color or pattern. The simple drape works best with a shorter scarf. But be warned, since there is no knot or looping, lightweight scarves can take off on a windy day! 

The Belted Drape

The belted drape is a great way to add plenty of color to your look or add a little warmth to a top with a lower neckline. It’s a quick way to transform what you’re wearing!

  • Step 1 Drape the scarf evenly around your neck and shoulders and let it hang down the front of your outfit.
  • Step 2 Add a skinny belt over the top of the scarf around your waist. As well as looking fantastic, the belt draws the outfit in around your waist, creating a flattering silhouette.

The Toss

The toss is the ultimate in casual sophistication! You will need a longer scarf for this one, but the classy carefree look that it creates works just as well with a t-shirt as it does with a ballgown!

  • Step 1 Let the scarf drape evenly around your neck.
  • Step 2 Simply toss one end of the scarf over the opposite shoulder, and you’re done! This one’s great under a jacket on a windy day.

The Reverse Drape

Like the toss, the reverse drape is great under a jacket on a windy day, and the ends of the scarf are hidden behind you, so it’s quite a minimal look too.

  • Step 1 Drape the scarf around your neck, with both ends hanging to the front.
  • Step 2 Toss one end of the scarf over the opposite shoulder, then toss the other end of the scarf over the other shoulder. This one looks best under an outer layer and is a great way of staying warm if you live in a colder climate!h

The Basic Loop

The basic loop is a great blend of simplicity and style, and the uneven finish means it doesn’t look too formal if you’re keeping your outfit casual. 

  • Step 1 Drape the scarf unevenly around your shoulders. Let the short end fall around your chest, with the longer end falling beneath your waist.
  • Step 2 Take the longer end and loop it once around your neck, letting it fall naturally towards your waist. It might take a couple of tries to get the look that’s right for you, but practice makes perfect!

The Infinity Scarf

Strictly speaking, the infinity scarf is a little different from the other scarves you might already have, but they’re a great addition for a slightly different look.
An infinity scarf is a loop of fabric, usually big enough to wrap around your neck at least twice. They’re not quite as versatile as a traditional scarf, but they’re zero-fuss, and you don’t have to worry about any loose ends!

Adding a Scarf to Your Wardrobe

For me, scarves are the ultimate accessory! They’re a fantastic way of adding some color, a little texture, or a pattern to what you’re wearing.

Try a few of the loops and knots I’ve suggested and see what you feel comfortable with. Some people like a double knot that ties snugly around the neck, and other people prefer something a little looser. Grab a scarf and give it a try. You might even decide that a scarf is a perfect gift for the man in your life; after all, channeling the style of David Beckham or Brad Pitt never hurts!

Please share in the comments if you like to wear a scarf, and what is your favorite way to tie it. Thank you for for sharing!

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